The Moderator

Bard College's student-run sexuality and body politics magazine

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Sunil Gupta is an Indian born artist and photographer based in London. Queer is his first monograph and offers a comprehensive overview of his work from the 1970s to the present. For decades he has explored narratives of contemporary gay life; tackled issues of gender and sexuality; and documented his own experiences living with AIDS. Queer is published by Prestel and is available on Amazon.

Source:  Feature Shoot

(via meyle)

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Musings from a Queercrip Femme Man of Color by Edward Ndopu

boyprincessdiaries:

I feel compelled to make it known that I do not move through the world as sometimes black, sometimes disabled, sometimes queer, sometimes femme, sometimes male and sometimes Afropolitan. I move through the world embodying all of those identities at the same time, all of the time. We often make the mistake of thinking that an intersectional identity means a set of compartmentalized lived experiences joined together. An intersectional identity is one lived experience layered with the complexity of sociopolitical and cultural context. To borrow the words of Eli Clare, “gender reaches into disability; disability wraps around class; class strains against abuse; abuse snarls into sexuality; sexuality folds on top of race…everything finally piling onto a single human body.”

When people asked me how I identified prior to my understanding of what it means to embody an intersectional identity, I gave them a rehearsed, succinct response because I didn’t want to overwhelm them with the complexity of my lived experience. I would say: I was born in Namibia, but brought up in South Africa, now living in Canada, and that I use a wheelchair because I was diagnosed with Spinal Muscular Atrophy at the age of two. I usually left it at that, hoping I satisfied at least some of their curiosity. Now, I make it known that my personal narrative cannot and should not be summarized because I am intentionally complex. I do not subscribe to normative ways of being and knowing. And I do not even want to try. I dwell in the grace of my differences. Born to a South African freedom fighter mother who fled the Apartheid regime to Namibia and went into self-imposed exile, I grew up knowing that everything is political, including my existence.

My existence necessitates a re-imagining of ontological and epistemological understandings of time and space. I identify as femme partially because masculinity has given me nothing in terms of validation and self-actualization. Being a femme man allows me to perform masculinity outside of its heteropatriarchal gaze. People who are invested in hegemonic conceptions of gender may label my gender expression ‘effeminate.’ My gender expression is femme, not effeminate. The latter is an adjective couched in a web of patriarchal, cis normative, trans misogynistic assumptions. The former is a self-identification grounded in the divine feminine. I very much claim my masculinity, it just happens to be a feminine manifestation of masculinity. Notwithstanding the sociopolitical imposition of an inaccessible world and cultural paradigm, disabled femmes of all genders teach able bodied ness new ways of being beautiful in the world. We firmly belief that there is no shame in seeking glamour, power and magnificence if you have been labeled undesirable, useless and inconsequential; there’s no shame because those things already abide within the spirit, they’re yours for the seeking.

As a disabled femme, I deal with pain, rejection and solitude in ways that compel the people around me to redefine courage and tenacity. I reconfigure sexiness and sweetness and passion in the name of ugliness, tragedy and the promise of survival. Forget being inspirational, disabled femmes want to be everything. We want to move through the world on our own terms, guided by a bright flame of fabulousness. As I see it, we should all be allowed to simultaneously enjoy and problematize the myriad of ways we show up in sociocultural spaces. We neither have to give up the fabulous, nor put up with its shit. There’s space for complex shades of grey in our experiences, because we have been accorded with the inalienable agency to exist and embody that existence in sexy, dynamic, conventional and counter-hegemonic ways. Indeed, I’m relentless in my pursuit of the limelight. But, I’m more obsessed with embodying light. Since leaving South Africa, I’ve grown more and more comfortable identifying as an Afropolitan. As Taiye Selasie put it, “what most typifies the Afropolitan consciousness is the refusal to oversimplify; the effort to understand what is ailing in Africa alongside the desire to honour what is wonderful [and] unique. Rather than essentializing the geographical entity, we seek to comprehend the cultural complexity; to honor the intellectual and spiritual legacy; and to sustain our parents’ cultures.”

To negotiate my survival as a disabled queer femme Afropolitan, I break down what it means to survive into little pieces of grace, then take those little pieces of grace and reconstruct existence in a way that challenges the normative. Without difference, the universe would be less vulnerable, less revealing, less courageous.

Edward (Eddie) Ndopu is a black (dis) abled queer femme Afro-politan living in Ottawa, Ontario. Named by the Mail and Guardian Newspaper as one of their Top 200 Young South Africans, he is a social critic, anti-oppression practitioner, consultant, writer and scholar.

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*This writer received an honorarium for this piece. If you want to support QTPOC being paid for their work, please consider making a donation to BGD!

(Source: theboyprincessdiaries, via stophatingyourbody)

131 notes

southernqueer:


☆☆☆☆help me cut my breasts off!☆☆☆☆
hello tumblr! my name is ezra. i’m a 19 year old non-binary trans kid and an aspiring transsexual and i’m looking to get top surgery soon.
as a 20-credit college student who is working and heading several extracurricular activities i don’t have much time or expenses, and my family does not support me at all with respect to my gender identity. i don’t have much money but the necessity of the surgery for me at this point in my life has driven me to ask people to donate anything they’re comfortable with giving to help—the necessity of being able to be comfortable and feel safe and okay in my body.
i am no longer able to bind my chest due to scoliosis and related back problems, and baggy clothes can only get a person so far. getting misgendered and having my gender identity invalidated and ignored because of my appearance has nearly killed me a few times and will undoubtedly make me feel ashamed and angry and upset many, many more. top surgery isn’t a magic cure-all that will fix everything at once, but it is a massive step in the right direction.
i’m hoping to raise $7500 to pay for the surgery and lodging in florida, where the surgeon i’ve chosen operates. if you’re unable to help financially, please consider spreading the link, by word of mouth, online, or in any other way you can! for serious, everything helps.
thank you so much for your time!

southernqueer:

help me cut my breasts off!

hello tumblr! my name is ezra. i’m a 19 year old non-binary trans kid and an aspiring transsexual and i’m looking to get top surgery soon.

as a 20-credit college student who is working and heading several extracurricular activities i don’t have much time or expenses, and my family does not support me at all with respect to my gender identity. i don’t have much money but the necessity of the surgery for me at this point in my life has driven me to ask people to donate anything they’re comfortable with giving to help—the necessity of being able to be comfortable and feel safe and okay in my body.

i am no longer able to bind my chest due to scoliosis and related back problems, and baggy clothes can only get a person so far. getting misgendered and having my gender identity invalidated and ignored because of my appearance has nearly killed me a few times and will undoubtedly make me feel ashamed and angry and upset many, many more. top surgery isn’t a magic cure-all that will fix everything at once, but it is a massive step in the right direction.

i’m hoping to raise $7500 to pay for the surgery and lodging in florida, where the surgeon i’ve chosen operates. if you’re unable to help financially, please consider spreading the link, by word of mouth, online, or in any other way you can! for serious, everything helps.

thank you so much for your time!

(Source: decadent69)